Research Seminar
China and the Maritime Silk Routes:
The Role of China’s Contacts with the Asia-Pacific and the Viceroyalty of Peru in Early Modern Times
Abstract:
 
During China’s middle period, and in early modern times, Chinese merchants, diplomats, or even soldiers were engaged in East and Southeast Asian waters as well as in the eastern Indian Ocean space. But they did not, as a rule, venture into the Pacific beyond the Philippine Archipelago. At least officially, little to no interest was shown in the Asia-Pacific region.
 
Analysing little-known, and little-studied documents, manuscripts, and archaeological sources (mainly shipwrecks), this presentation seeks to provide fresh insights into the history of contacts between China and the Viceroyalty of Peru in the 16th to late 18th centuries.
 
Biographical:
 
Angela Schottenhammer (蕭婷) is professor of Non-European and World History at the University of Salzburg, Austria, and research director and adjunct professor (Chinese History) at the Indian Ocean World Centre (IOWC), History Department, McGill University, Canada. 
 
She obtained her Ph.D. in 1993 from Würzburg University, Germany, with a thesis on “Song Period Tomb inscriptions” (M.A. 1989 on Liao Mosha and the Cultural Revolution) and her Habilitation degree 2000 from Munich University with a thesis on “Song Time Quanzhou in a Conflict Situation Between Central Government and Maritime Trade: Unexpected Consequences of the Central Government’s Grasp for the Wealth of a Coastal Region”.
 
She has been working as professor of Chinese History at Ghent University, Belgium (2010-2013), the Centro de Estudios de Asia y África (CEAA), El Colegio de México (2009-2010), at Marburg University (2006-7 and 2008-9) and as research/project director at the Department for Asian Studies, Munich University (2002-2009).
 
She is the editor of the Online journal Crossroads – Studies on the History of Exchange Relations in the East Asian World and of the book series Crossroads – History of Interactions across the Silk Routes (Brill) and East Asian Maritime History (Harrassowitz) and has widely published on traditional Chinese history, archaeology and culture as well as China’s manifold historical exchange relations and her integration into the Eurasian and global context.
 
Speaker(s) Professor Angela SCHOTTENHAMMER
Professor of Non-European and Global History
History Department
University of Salzburg
Date 26 Nov 2018 (Monday)
Time 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Venue Room 3301, Academic Building Lift no. 2
Language English
Remarks All Are Welcome